+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. Senior Member win2k8's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    1.0.0.127.in-addr.arpa
    Posts
    258

    Certifications
    Net+, Sec+
    #1

    Default Need some DNS Forwarder Clarification

    Hey guys,

    So I'm finally getting serious about finishing my MCSA, and in the process trying my best to get my head around DNS. So based on my limited knowledge so far, One should almost never use a forwarder instead use a stub zone? And from my understanding stub zones only have the minimal records like about the name server, SOA and A records. And supposedly if any of this changes it automatically updates in the stub zone. However I'm not clear on how a forwarder zone updates if it updates at all. And what parts of it update like the records hosted or just like stub zone only the SOA, A, and name server?

    Thanks in advance,

    win2k8
    Last edited by win2k8; 09-18-2009 at 12:09 AM. Reason: typo
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  2. SS -->
  3. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    297

    Certifications
    A+, Network +, MCSE 2003, CCNA:S, VCP 4
    #2
    Quote Originally Posted by win2k8 View Post
    Hey guys,

    So I'm finally getting serious about finishing my MCSA, and in the process trying my best to get my head around DNS. So based on my limited knowledge so far, One should almost never use a forwarder instead use a stub zone? And from my understanding stub zones only have the minimal records like about the name server, SOA and A records. And supposedly if any of this changes it automatically updates in the stub zone. However I'm not clear on how a forwarder zone updates if it updates at all. And what parts of it update like the records hosted or just like stub zone only the SOA, A, and name server?

    Thanks in advance,

    win2k8
    No such thing as a forwarder zone. A forwarder is just a server you tell your DNS server to "forward" requests to. You would use your ISP's DNS servers as forwarders, so anytime a client wants to resolve a local hostname then your DNS server does the work, but if a client wants to resolve a name like google.com then your DNS server will forward the request to someone who knows then keep a copy of the answer in its cache.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  4. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    2,056

    Certifications
    Beer+
    #3
    a conditional forwarder is used in place of a stub zone for certain situations

    Contrasting stub zones and conditional forwarders
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  5. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    492
    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by win2k8 View Post
    Hey guys,

    So I'm finally getting serious about finishing my MCSA, and in the process trying my best to get my head around DNS. So based on my limited knowledge so far, One should almost never use a forwarder instead use a stub zone? And from my understanding stub zones only have the minimal records like about the name server, SOA and A records. And supposedly if any of this changes it automatically updates in the stub zone. However I'm not clear on how a forwarder zone updates if it updates at all. And what parts of it update like the records hosted or just like stub zone only the SOA, A, and name server?

    Thanks in advance,

    win2k8
    As per above comment, no such thing as a forwarder zone. Right click dns server, go to properties and check out the forwarder tab.

    The stub zone does not contain A records either, they contain:

    The start of authority (SOA) resource record, name server (NS) resource records, and the glue A resource records for the delegated zone.

    The IP address of one or more master servers that can be used to update the stub zone.

    Check out the link:
    Understanding stub zones: Domain Name System(DNS)

    Reply With Quote Quote  

  6. Senior Member win2k8's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    1.0.0.127.in-addr.arpa
    Posts
    258

    Certifications
    Net+, Sec+
    #5
    Thanks for the answers guys. Another quick question is when would you use a sub-domain rather than just a delegation? From what I think is that in a sub-domain you can create/write resource records and etc just like a primary zone, however when you have a delegation only thing you it does is forward requests to another dns server?

    win2k8
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  7. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    2,056

    Certifications
    Beer+
    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by win2k8 View Post
    Thanks for the answers guys. Another quick question is when would you use a sub-domain rather than just a delegation? From what I think is that in a sub-domain you can create/write resource records and etc just like a primary zone, however when you have a delegation only thing you it does is forward requests to another dns server?

    win2k8

    A sub-domain would be used for massive implimentations or possibly distance offices over crap links, and some other reasons, maybe to divide up management of different sections of the DNS infrastructure.

    A delegation isnt going to provide full functionality that a subdomain would. In the case of a delegation, the delegated server is just working for the primary server and in a subdomain setting the subdomain DNS servers are running their own game.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  8. Senior Member win2k8's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    1.0.0.127.in-addr.arpa
    Posts
    258

    Certifications
    Net+, Sec+
    #7
    Thanks for the clarification Hyper-Me. I am fairly new to DNS in terms of infrastructure.

    win2k8
    Reply With Quote Quote  

+ Reply to Thread

Social Networking & Bookmarks