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  1. Network Security tpatt100's Avatar
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    #51
    Quote Originally Posted by Danielm7 View Post
    tpatt100, very interesting viewpoint. What you're talking about is more how much wife uses a computer today, 99% on her phone, then uses a laptop if she has to write up a document, but also works in the medical field so it's a different situation. I'm assuming you work in security from your cert list, surprised you never need "a real computer" once you leave work.
    I have a work issued laptop that runs Windows 10, if I have to do work stuff I just vpn in. I really don’t use computers for personal stuff anymore.

    I do most of my studies at work when I get some time so I use their systems which they are cool with. I started a Splunk course and since it’s for work I just study there. I take notes on my iPad which comes home with me.
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  3. Senior Member si20's Avatar
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    May 2014
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    #52
    Quote Originally Posted by wd40 View Post
    I had very limited interaction with macbooks, I found the menu bar confusing.

    Regarding SSH, Python and other Linux tools (vi for example), you can use them now on the windows 10 Linux subsystem without the need to setup VMs.

    Regarding Linux, I use Linux (Kali) mainly now, and it is not user friendly at all, if you face a driver (Nvidia driver) or application issue, good luck in finding a quick solution.
    This.

    I own an iMac 27" 2017 model, a MacBook Pro (2011 model), a gaming PC (windows 10) and a ubuntu laptop. I'd love to be able to run linux full-time, but it's just too damn hard to solve driver issues. Also, more often than not, linux drivers for Nvidia cards drain your battery (on a laptop) like crazy, even if you aren't gaming.

    Macs are good pieces of kit but severely underpowered for the price you pay. On top of that, Apple has a complete monopoly on batteries which basically ties you in to their products. It's pure corporate greed that you cannot replace the battery on new Macbooks. That's why I bought an iMac, because I don't need to worry about the battery situation. Once you've had 500-600 charge cycles on a Mac, you'll be lucky if it lasts 4 hours on a full charge.

    My 2011 MacBook that I'm typing from now gets just 3 hours 15 mins from a full charge and I'm on 728 cycles. When it hits 1,000, it's basically scrap. Apple don't make the batteries for the 2011 model any more, and 3rd party batteries are cheap crap.

    Apple could take over the entire industry if they lowered their prices - but people will buy them at inflated prices, so they refuse to drop the price.

    My 2 cents: If you're an iOS or Mac developer - then you should own a Mac. If you aren't an iOS or Mac dev, then you're just wasting your cash.
    Future certs: CEH v10 (maybe)
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  4. Senior Member snokerpoker's Avatar
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    #53
    I prefer to work on a PC. I like using MAC OSX for personal use though.
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  5. Senior Member
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    #54
    They gave me like a $2400 macbook for work. Build quality is second to none. Battery life superb. Love how it remembers what I was working on after reboot too. Still though, I'd never spend that money for personal use unless I was doing super well financially and didn't care about an extra grand. They jack up the price for a little bit of storage and memory, it's insane. Lack of being able to plug in a flash drive or USB mouse or anything without an adapter can be inconvenient though.
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  6. Network Engineer Hondabuff's Avatar
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    #55
    Problem is when you break a PC with windows you can find support and parts everywhere. You break a Mac and you have to go to that stupid store at the mall and talk to that dude with the nose ring and tossel cap. Just buy a HP ultrabook bump the RAM up to 16GB and Slap in a 1TB SSD and call it done. Then you can buy something more useful like a massage chair from Brookstone or something while your at the mall.
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  7. Little Teapot LeBroke's Avatar
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    #56
    I always find it weird when people complain that Macs cost too much for the specs they offer.

    MBPs are premium ultrabooks, not cheap Acer crap.

    It's fair to compare them to something like a ThinkPad X1 Carbon, Dell XPS, or Razer Blade (the latter isn't really a business line laptop but it's in the same category). Look at things like ergonomics, build quality, battery life, screen quality, form factor/portability. How well the ecosystem works together. How much bloatware there is.

    It's stupid to look at something like this: https://www.apple.com/ca/shop/buy-ma...ok-pro/15-inch

    And wonder why people buy it instead of something like this: https://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX69278 which is like half the price for similar specs.

    They aren't equivalent at all and have a different audience. I'm perfectly happy with my 13" Pro. Portability and native UNIX shell are invaluable. I can't even stand to use most Windows laptops that aren't business ultrabooks. They're too damn heavy, too damn flimsy, and most things about them suck (except the price).
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  8. Senior Member pevangel's Avatar
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    #57
    We have a MacBook Pro at home and it doesn't get much use. We moved to a new house earlier this year and it hasn't left the box it was moved in. At home we're mostly using our phones to surf the Internet. When we do use our laptops, it's usually the Windows laptops because they're far superior when it comes to processing power. One of our laptops has a Xeon processor with 64G of RAM. The other has an i7-7700K with 32G of RAM. Both have dedicated GPUs and SSD drives. We don't necessarily need all that horsepower all the time, but sometimes we do. So it's easier to stick to the laptops that can handle everything we need, than use the MBP that can only handle some things.
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