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  1. Senior Member DexterPark's Avatar
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    #1

    Default 5 Reasons you should get a Mac

    This can start some arguments, but whatever, let's be real. I've been a Windows user for a while, heck, I've even worked for Microsoft! Not only would I recommend avoiding the company, I would strongly suggest avoiding the products!

    Look, a Mac is basically a usable form of Linux. It has a UI that doesn't suck, and all the built in network engineering tools you could ever need! And god forbid you learn automation and bump your salary by 30%, what platform do you see most Ansible, Python, Javascript, Puppet, chef users, etc?

    1) Putty? You mean terminal, ssh x.x.x.x -l username
    2) Windows/Android = ~100k /yr
    3) It works. Like, at a high level. (If you see someone trying to run Docker on Win10...RUN!)
    4) brew install...pip install....parallel....What else do you need?
    5) Dota, Stellaris, XCOM, all work on Mac. Steam works on Mac. Why are you on WinBLOWS?

    It used to be the old stereotype that only idiots had Macs, now it's the best in class IT professionals (Not all, BUT MOST!). Apple does $230 billion in revenue, Microsoft does $90 and has been around the exact same amount of time. Numbers don't lie.7
    Last edited by DexterPark; 11-16-2017 at 04:27 AM.
    My advice to anyone looking to advance their career would be to learn DevOps tools and methodologies. Learn how to write code in languages like Python and JavaScript. Not to be a programmer, but a network automation specialist who can do the job of 10 engineers in 1/3 of the time. Create a GitHub account, download PyCharm, play with Ansible, Chef, or Puppet. Automation isn't the future, it's here today and the landscape is changing dramatically.
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  3. Senior Member NetworkingStudent's Avatar
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    #2
    Quote Originally Posted by DexterPark View Post
    This can start some arguments, but whatever, let's be real. I've been a Windows user for a while, heck, I've even worked for Microsoft! Not only would I recommend avoiding the company, I would strongly suggest avoiding the products!

    Look, a Mac is basically a usable form of Linux. It has a UI that doesn't suck, and all the built in network engineering tools you could ever need! And god forbid you learn automation and bump your salary by 30%, what platform do you see most Ansible, Python, Javascript, Puppet, chef users, etc?

    1) Putty? You mean ssh x.x.x.x -l username
    2) Windows/Android = ~100k /yr
    3) It works. Like, at a high level. (If you see someone trying to run Docker on Win10...RUN!)
    4) brew install...pip install....parallel....What else do you need?
    5) Dota, Stellaris, XCOM, all work on Mac. Steam works on Mac. Why are you on WinBLOWS?

    It used to be the old stereotype that only idiots had Macs, now it's the best in class IT professionals (Not all, BUT MOST!). Apple does $230 billion in revenue, Microsoft does $90 and has been around the exact same amount of time. Numbers don't lie.
    I would like to get MAC, but may they're VERY expensive. Why are they so expensive?

    Apple makes Macs hard to upgrade/ repair VS PCs....why?

    I have run across a lot of IT pros that hate apple and MACS..why?

    Do Macs integrate well in a AD environment?
    When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened."

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    #3
    aannnnddd if you need a cable, a charger, or basically anything, its all proprietary so you gotta pay $ for it.

    There is advantages, and i do like the hardware configuration they are nicely built. I saw a macbook pro for about 2k today i can get comparable hardware in a pc for much much less and dual boot with linux os of my choice
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  5. Senior Member DexterPark's Avatar
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    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by NetworkingStudent View Post
    I would like to get MAC, but may they're VERY expensive. Why are they so expensive?

    Apple makes Macs hard to upgrade/ repair VS PCs....why?

    I have run across a lot of IT pros that hate apple and MACS..why?

    Do Macs integrate well in a AD environment?
    1) You've got to spend money to make money.

    2) Because they make $230 billion /yr. I am also pissed off that I have to buy the charging cable separate from the base station, but if that's the price to avoid all the trash OS's I'll buy twice!

    3) "Salting is used because most bacteria, fungi and other potentially pathogenic organisms cannot survive in a highly salty environment".

    4) Yes. MacBooks support AD integration but then again, waterboarding works on everyone.
    My advice to anyone looking to advance their career would be to learn DevOps tools and methodologies. Learn how to write code in languages like Python and JavaScript. Not to be a programmer, but a network automation specialist who can do the job of 10 engineers in 1/3 of the time. Create a GitHub account, download PyCharm, play with Ansible, Chef, or Puppet. Automation isn't the future, it's here today and the landscape is changing dramatically.
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  6. Senior Member DexterPark's Avatar
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    #5
    $2k? DEAL! Mine cost $2600 without a magic mouse, keyboard, or LG 5K monitor...

    But YES, NO.....They are not cheap, affordable, reasonable, or whatever but if you want to be rich in this field get with the program or get left in the dirt.
    My advice to anyone looking to advance their career would be to learn DevOps tools and methodologies. Learn how to write code in languages like Python and JavaScript. Not to be a programmer, but a network automation specialist who can do the job of 10 engineers in 1/3 of the time. Create a GitHub account, download PyCharm, play with Ansible, Chef, or Puppet. Automation isn't the future, it's here today and the landscape is changing dramatically.
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  7. ABL - Always Be Labbin' Iristheangel's Avatar
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    #6
    Trying to convince people of changing their compute platform is like talking about religion or politics. It all depends on use case and what people need them for. Macbooks would suck for my use case.

    Personally, if I want Linux I'll get a PC and slap Linux on it or throw it on a VM. I also create a lot of training videos and do a lot of remote presentations/whiteboarding. I have zero interest in carting around a Wacom tablet on my travels and I'm not going to spend another $1000 on another tablet (iPad Pro) to have yet another thing to cart around and it doesn't run full apps. That's why I've been a happy Surface Pro 4 user for the last couple years and just paid for the Surface Book 2 15" inch today funny enough.

    SurfaceBook.jpg

    That digitizer is gold for me. Not only do I get to whiteboard architectures and walk through fun stuff on a call (humorous sample below)
    Diagramming.jpg

    But I can easily import a diagram and start drawing over it to on the fly. Pretty fun stuff.

    As I said, to each their own and use case is important. My wife has a Macbook Pro because her industry has certain apps that only run on Macbooks but she loathes it and wishes she could switch over. She'd held off on buying a newer one because of that annoying bar and some of the poor UI changes they've made to the hardware. For me, I want something that's powerful but I can quickly convert into presentation mode and be able to run a few VMs on if I need to spin something up and test. Big displays are also important. That 15" Surface Book 2 I just bought is going to help my poor eyes as I lab stuff out so I'm happier for it
    Last edited by Iristheangel; 11-16-2017 at 07:07 AM.
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  8. Not IT n00b dave330i's Avatar
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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by DexterPark View Post
    It used to be the old stereotype that only idiots had Macs, now it's the best in class IT professionals (Not all, BUT MOST!). Apple does $230 billion in revenue, Microsoft does $90 and has been around the exact same amount of time. Numbers don't lie.7
    About 70% of Apple revenue is iPhone.

    I had to get a new work laptop early this year. I switched from a Mac to a Win10 for following reasons:

    1. Mac Pro maxed out at 16 GB. Seriously?! I need to run multiple VMs. 16 GB is a joke.

    2. Smart bar. A gimmick POS that just slows me down.
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  9. Senior Member McxRisley's Avatar
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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by DexterPark View Post
    1) You've got to spend money to make money.

    2) Because they make $230 billion /yr. I am also pissed off that I have to buy the charging cable separate from the base station, but if that's the price to avoid all the trash OS's I'll buy twice!

    3) "Salting is used because most bacteria, fungi and other potentially pathogenic organisms cannot survive in a highly salty environment".

    4) Yes. MacBooks support AD integration but then again, waterboarding works on everyone.
    I think he's trolling? If not he has definitely had too much koolaid from Apple.
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    #9
    There has been a trend of companies moving all their computers to Mac, I see it daily in doctors offices and law firms. Seems like a good idea, but they find out that getting an IT company to support their Mac's is pretty difficult around this region. There's things I like about them and things I don't like. I'm a Microsoft guy until the industry switches to something else. I gotta go where the clients take me, but I won't own Mac's simply out of my price range when a PC will do exactly what I need.
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  11. Senior Member Danielh22185's Avatar
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    #10
    I've not once run into a problem doing my job as a network engineer that required a MAC to do. In fact, I have seen several occasions of where the opposite is the case. Does this mean Apple is garbage, no.. but this does for me mean they seem to have fundamental problems that have turned me away from them and I will never gravitate to them for a laptop / desktop use.

    If I need to code some automation tasks. Simple! I have a dedicated VM I run linux / python on. I will give you a slight win there though because you can do those things more natively from a MAC because it is linux based.

    For my home computing, I have a desktop I've had for 7 years and it's still going very strong. Mainly because I have been able to make a few cost-effective upgrades to keep it that way. I built the entire thing for much, much, much, less than the cost of a high-end MAC desktop. You can't even build / buy a MAC with the same high-end components available for PC which really turns me away too because I love building / tweaking my devices.

    Don't forget the compatibility issues at the enterprise level, gaming, and the dang peripherals! (yes I know the peripherals is more of a marketing gimmick. My car needs gas too, so I buy it no matter the cost).

    Also don't even get me started on their wireless problems...
    Last edited by Danielh22185; 11-16-2017 at 02:36 PM.
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  12. Senior Member kohr-ah's Avatar
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    #11
    As a guy who uses a Mac for work I would prefer going back to Windows if I could. I don't hate my Mac but I have been able to run SSH via powershell or BASH integration. If a part on my Macbook dies I have to send it in for repairs while on my Windows backup I can go up the street and just get a part and have it swapped out. As much as I like lucidchart or draw.io I prefer Visio still for my documentation.

    Gaming - Some games work for mac, some games work for linux, all the games work for Windows. I prefer to not have to pick, choose or emulate.

    But everyone has their preferences. Just like I have friends that swear linux is the way to go and ditch Mac and Windows all together. Just depends your preferences.
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  13. Senior Member
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    #12
    Quote Originally Posted by DexterPark View Post
    Look, a Mac is basically a usable form of Linux.
    Mac is NOT Linux, MacOS is UNIX, actually the closest open-source OS (besides Darwin of course) is FreeBSD.
    And getting back to the topic, I plan to replace my ancient MacBook Pro with either Thinkpad or XPS and dual-boot Windows 10 and whatever Linux flavour I prefer on that day...
    I'll keep my MBP to have fun with Logic though
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  14. Senior Member wd40's Avatar
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    #13
    I had very limited interaction with macbooks, I found the menu bar confusing.

    Regarding SSH, Python and other Linux tools (vi for example), you can use them now on the windows 10 Linux subsystem without the need to setup VMs.

    Regarding Linux, I use Linux (Kali) mainly now, and it is not user friendly at all, if you face a driver (Nvidia driver) or application issue, good luck in finding a quick solution.
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  15. What The?! Fulcrum45's Avatar
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    #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Iristheangel View Post
    Personally, if I want Linux I'll get a PC and slap Linux on it or throw it on a VM.
    Exactly my thoughts. I appreciate MACs for their design and simplicity but I'm not willing to pay for it.
    Last edited by Fulcrum45; 11-16-2017 at 03:29 PM.
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  16. Senior Member
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    #15
    This thread needs pics of IT folks with Macbooks who run Windows on them.

    I have some myself, but not at work where I'm at right now and will supply later if noone else volunteers their time to this noble cause.
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    #16
    I use a laptop with only MSDOS installed

    what you going to do about that?
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  18. Went to the dark side.... Moderator networker050184's Avatar
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    #17
    I've always been a linux guy the past five years or so, but recently made the switch to Mac for my work machine. It's a nice OS and great hardware. My use cases on this laptop are fairly simple though. VPN, terminal, slack and a web browser 90% of the time. No complaints so far. Would I spend a ton of my own money on one though? Not likely.
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  19. ABL - Always Be Labbin' Iristheangel's Avatar
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    #18
    Quote Originally Posted by technogoat View Post
    I use a laptop with only MSDOS installed

    what you going to do about that?
    You'll never break above ~$100k without a Mac!
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  20. They are watching you NetworkNewb's Avatar
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    #19
    Quote Originally Posted by networker050184 View Post
    Would I spend a ton of my own money on one though? Not likely.
    I'm with this. They are nice and I like them, but hard to justify the cost when purchasing one on your own dime.
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  21. Passion For IT
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    #20
    All the Microsoft/Windows bashing really makes me question your post. It comes off as fanboyish. You're not wrong on some accounts, but dismissing Windows as a viable and good OS for sysadmins puts me off.

    Mac's are great machines. If you can use them for what you need to, great. If not, that's completely fine, too. At work, I have a Windows 10 machine, a Mac (older, but it checks out), and several Linux VM's. All have their strong points, all have their weak points. Use what you have to use to get **** done.
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  22. Member NuclearBeavis's Avatar
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    #21
    Macs don't have a trackpoint. Thus I have to stick with Thinkpads.
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  23. Senior Member
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    #22
    I recently purchased a laptop with Windows 10 Pro, Intel i7 processor, 32 gig of DDR4 RAM, 500GB SSD primary and 2TB Hybrid storage, GeForce GTX graphics and other goodies for $1500.

    I'll admit that MacBook Pro's are pretty slick, but you don't get much for your money.
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  24. Member NuclearBeavis's Avatar
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    #23
    Quote Originally Posted by ITSec14 View Post
    I'll admit that MacBook Pro's are pretty slick, but you don't get much for your money.
    I was looking at them recently and to just get 16GB + 512GB SSD, you have to spend about $3000+. That includes their Apple Care, which is a must, since the unit is basically one circuit board, and if anything goes wrong, the repair bill is in the 4 figures.
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  25. Gaming Tech Expert Dakinggamer87's Avatar
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    #24
    I will stick with my awesome gaming PC that I can easily upgrade and have full control over the parts and ecosystem...

    Apple is overpriced and rather use that money for cooler stuff!! They are nice computers but I can make that 2-3k stretch much further on a PC build all day everyday!! To each his own tho
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    #25
    I scream, you scream, but we all want ice cream.

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