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  1. Junior Member
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    #1

    Default Value of CompTIA Certifications?

    Hello everyone!
    I want to pursue my CompTIA A+, Network+, and Security+ certs. After that, I'm not sure which CompTIA certifications are worth taking. I was interested in Cloud+, Linux+, Server+, Storage+, and a few others. Are these worth taking? Will they actually add to my resume value? If they aren't worth much, should I still take them if just to increase my knowledge? I am in the final year of a dual degree in Network Technology and Information Systems Security, and I was totally lost listening to a few people from my school's IT service talk. I aced every course I've taken and remember 90% of what I've learned, and I feel pretty unprepared for the real world.

    CompTIA certs seem like a good way to build core knowledge. Anyone agree or have any other suggestions?

    Thanks!
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  3. Junior Starcraft Engineer
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    #2
    Linux+ is a good one. The rest you can take or leave. I won't say they're worthless, but without exception I would argue there are better choices you can make beyond the trio and Linux+. Vendor certifications, CASP, degrees, non-credentialed skill improvement, whatever.
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  4. Junior Member
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    #3
    Thanks ptilsen!
    I'm looking forward to Linux+, so its good to see some people agree its worth taking. If I have the time/money, I think I will go for the other CompTIA certifications, even if I don't list them on my resume.
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  5. Junior Starcraft Engineer
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    #4
    Well, list them if you get them. It's not that they don't add anything. If I see Server+ or Storage+ on a prospective junior sysadmin's resume, it definitely adds something on top of the trio, particularly if he or she lacks any real server experience. However, time spent on Server+ or Storage+ is time not spent on MCSA, RHCSA, or VCPfar better certifications for a prospective junior admin and certainly for a more senior admin or engineer. Much, much better value there, and you'll learn the important server and storage concepts along the way.

    The CompTIAs by comparison are kind of meh, because a lot of the requirements are memorizing hardware or protocol details that won't make you more valuable compared to just knowing the concepts and having a strong general knowledge. The vendor certs on the other hand show you have real, specific knowledge useful in those systems. Knowing the basics of servers and storage will be implicit with having them. If you're not ready for the vendor certs, the CompTIAs are probably worth getting and listing, but overall I'd recommend one of the vendor certs as the next step after the trio and/or Linux+.

    Cloud+ I'm not as sure about. The concepts on it are worth knowing, and I won't discourage you from studying it, but I haven't see any evidence that employers are really putting any value to it. I know I wouldn't assign any value to it when reviewing a candidate's resume.
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  6. Junior Member Registered Member
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    #5
    The Mobility+ is now in prelaunch. I visited mobility plus training website and notice they were offering HUGE discounts if you sign up before November 20th. I think this will be a beneficial certification to have. Im signing up today so I can get the discount.
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  7. Senior Member
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    #6
    I did the A+, Network+, and will finish Security+ shortly. Opinions will vary regarding these certifications. I believe that they helped me land my first job. Without them, I would not have likely been taken seriously with no IT experience.

    You can probably skip all of the others. Like others have said, vendor certifications would likely be better after the A+, N+, and S+. From speaking with friends in the field, you are very unlikely to get an opportunity to do much with a Linux+ certification. Some employers might look at it favorably because you are trying to learn. That being said, it doesn't seem like many people start right off with Linux administration.
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  8. Senior Member
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    #7
    Everyone's situation is different. If you want to go into networks network + or pc's and desktops A+ or security security +. I think a one sized fits all approach is goofy. Personally IMO getting certified in things you aren't interested can derail you from your passion. So many times I have seen someone on this forum come in and think they have to get the trifecta (A+, N+ and S+) when their passion is client operating systems. In that case I personally think they should go A+ then Windows 7 or 8 operating systems. If security is your thing maybe Security + then CCNA Security for example. That's just my opinion take it or leave it.
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  9. Senior Member srabiee's Avatar
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    #8
    It should also be considered that one may learn a lot when studying for CompTIA certs, especially those who are fairly new to IT. I'm not new to IT, but I still learned quite a bit during the process of studying for the six CompTIA certs that I hold.

    I have since moved on to Microsoft certs, but I plan on going back and getting the new Cloud+ and Mobility+ certs at some point next year, simply because I know I'll learn something new and CompTIA certifications generally don't take me very long to study for. Only downside is the $$$ exam cost, IMO.
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  10. Senior Member
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    #9
    CodyF, all these comments are great considerations for your future certification plans. I have a bunch of CompTIA certs, mostly because their "foundational" level works great in my own Server Administrator career, which is more like a "Jack of All Trades" type role. For example, I pursued RFID+ a few years ago only because my employer was using RFID, I wanted to be better educated in the basics of it, although I was not actively supporting it in my role. Similarly, I hadn't dealt much with printers over these last years, and took PDI+ as a refresher, and ironically, in a new job role I am finding myself administering printers more again because our desktop team is not as familiar. I wouldn't say my employers have ever really noticed my stack of CompTIA certs on a resume, and given me kudos for them. However, I think they have at least shown that I try to keep up with the basics of even those things I'm not doing day-to-day in order to be flexible and knowledgeable. I do think showing a track record of certifications from any vendor, shows a willingness to learn.

    That being said, there is a time when you need to determine that some vendor certs may be more worthwhile. I'm probably going to need to pursue more Exchange certs soon to justify knowledge to my boss.

    As an aside, if you keep studying, try to aim for certifications, or degrees, or vocation certificates, etc. that you can list to show you are continually learning. I have worked with many a tech who find their careers have stagnated and stalled after several years, and they are going nowhere. When you look at their resume some evidence of education is scarcely listed, because the only time they will certify is 1) If they can learn it in a week at a company-paid for training course, and 2) Only if they can study during work hours on the job. Your career is your own, which means you must give up some of your own time to learn, study, and certify, or degree. I recently talked to one tech who is frustrated with not getting call backs on that ever-elusive server admin job he'd like. When I asked him, "How about studying for some more certs beyond A+ and N+ to prove your knowledge?" He responded, "It will take me forever to finish those exams because the company only allows me one, or two, weeks of training a year." And so those ever-elusive server admin jobs will likely remain ever-elusive for him.
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  11. Senior Member LittleBIT's Avatar
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    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by ThePawofRizzo View Post
    As an aside, if you keep studying, try to aim for certifications, or degrees, or vocation certificates, etc. that you can list to show you are continually learning. I have worked with many a tech who find their careers have stagnated and stalled after several years, and they are going nowhere. When you look at their resume some evidence of education is scarcely listed, because the only time they will certify is 1) If they can learn it in a week at a company-paid for training course, and 2) Only if they can study during work hours on the job. Your career is your own, which means you must give up some of your own time to learn, study, and certify, or degree. I recently talked to one tech who is frustrated with not getting call backs on that ever-elusive server admin job he'd like. When I asked him, "How about studying for some more certs beyond A+ and N+ to prove your knowledge?" He responded, "It will take me forever to finish those exams because the company only allows me one, or two, weeks of training a year." And so those ever-elusive server admin jobs will likely remain ever-elusive for him.
    Best advice I have ever read by far.

    Continual education is what IT is all about. If you get a CISSP and stop there, your hurting your career, falling behind, and putting your organization at risk because you are not educating yourself on the latest threats.
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