+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    43

    Certifications
    MCSA 2003, A+, Net+, Sec+, CCNA, ITIL v3, CEH
    #1

    Default My wife is planning to get her PMP

    My wife would like to have a career change and is looking at this cert. She have a bachelor degree in marketing and have been working as a receptionist at a dental office. What do you guys recommend for her to quickly get her 4,500 hours and 35 hours?

    Taken from their website:
    Prerequisites
    Secondary degree (high school diploma, associate’s degree or the global equivalent)
    7,500 hours leading and directing projects
    35 hours of project management education
    OR


    Four-year degree
    4,500 hours leading and directing projects
    35 hours of project management education
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  2. SS
  3. Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    26

    Certifications
    M.A., M.S., CISSP, CISA, CISM, Security+, MCSE, A+, NET+, Project+, CIW
    #2
    Have her go to the PMI.org and register to become a member. This can be done without passing the PMP. Then there are various volunteer opportunities available. If she does a good job there (while accumulating hours) she might get offered a job as a project coordinator... that role counts as well as the volunteer hours. It's a start...

    LR
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  4. This site changed my life mzx380's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    412

    Certifications
    ITIL, ACA, VCP-DCV, Linux+, CCNA, PMP
    #3
    The 35 hour training is the easy part, just register for a course online. If she does not have the requisite experience, she may benefit from paying significantly more but attend classroom training which will be a good primer and fulfill the hours at the same time.

    Getting experience will be a lot harder. If she does not have any experience leading a project (which it sounds like she doesn't), she may want to start with CAPM exam first which will give her more to work with when applying for PM or coordinator positions.
    Currently Working On: PMI-ACP
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  5. They are watching you NetworkNewb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Off the grid
    Posts
    2,936

    Certifications
    A+/Net+/Sec+, CCENT, CCNA:Sec, CCSK, GCIH
    #4
    Did anyone else read that title as "pimp" at first?


    Sorry, I have no valuable contribution. Best of luck to her!
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  6. Senior Member E Double U's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    1,343

    Certifications
    CISSP, CISM, CISA, GPEN, GCIA, GCIH, C|EH, and more.
    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by NetworkNewb View Post
    Did anyone else read that title as "pimp" at first? !
    Dude, I was thinking exactly that! My wife is planning to get her pimp - sounds like a Jerry Springer episode title.
    "You tried your best and you failed miserably. The lesson is, never try." - Homer Simpson
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  7. Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    1,986

    Certifications
    70-461
    #6
    PMP is for project managers who have been in the trade for a while. No offense but this is why this certification is no longer viewed as being "valuable". I would suggest taking courses from Coursera or another provider and learning the methodology, process, tools etc.....
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  8. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Fort Worth
    Posts
    299

    Certifications
    MS IS, CISM, CRISC, PMP, PMI-ACP, CSM, EMCISA, COBIT 5, ITIL
    #7
    The certification has plenty of value. In fact, it's the most valuable cert I have.
    "If I were to say, 'God, why me?' about the bad things, then I should have said, 'God, why me?' about the good things that happened in my life."

    Arthur Ashe

    Reply With Quote Quote  

  9. Scruffy-looking nerfherdr tedjames's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Surf City, TX
    Posts
    749

    Certifications
    SSCP, Security+, eJPT +4
    #8
    She may consider starting with Project+.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  10. Senior Member za3bour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Santa Cruz, USA
    Posts
    1,062

    Certifications
    BS:Electrical Engineering,CISM, DRE, AMBCI, MCITP-EA,SA, MCP, CCNA
    #9
    I don't think the certificate is as valuable now as before it is however still popular and still requested by companies/recruiters. Do a simple search on LinkedIn or any job search site such as glassdoor, indeed or dice and you will find plenty of opportunities that are looking for PMP.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  11. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    204

    Certifications
    CISSP, PMP, CISA, MBA-MIS, Six Sigma (WhiteBelt), MCITP, MCSA, MCTS, VCA-Cloud, VCA-DCV, VCA-WFM
    #10
    Getting the PDU's is the easy part. The easiest I could find was this training here. It's a good training, offered by a PMI accredited source. Now comes the experience part. The whole point of being a PMP is to have the skills and the experience to showcase competencies in Project Management. This can only be achieved by getting into the project management or coordination roles. Registering with PMI and volunteering for opportunities can help get her some experience under her belt. I guess things can be a lot clearer afterwards.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  12. Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    1,986

    Certifications
    70-461
    #11
    Quote Originally Posted by datacomboss View Post
    The certification has plenty of value. In fact, it's the most valuable cert I have.
    That's anecdotal at best......

    Any IT shop worth their weight in salt have moved to some derivative of agile. GANTT charts have been replaced by Kanban boards and long planning cycles are no longer tolerated and have been replaced by the 2 week sprints. Anyone who has been in app development knows this. With the business leaders driving the business they don't want to be told no we are to ridged and inflexible to change scope. If IT is not enabling their business to go to market fast they are worthless.

    PMP aligns with Waterfall and that's why they are desperately getting into the agile space. It's real world, intuitive and worth something...
    Last edited by DatabaseHead; 03-30-2018 at 07:07 PM.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  13. Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    26

    Certifications
    M.A., M.S., CISSP, CISA, CISM, Security+, MCSE, A+, NET+, Project+, CIW
    #12
    I don't know why anyone with any experience in the field at all would say the the PMP certification no longer has value... that's just not true at all. There are plenty of jobs out there that REQUIRE the PMP in order for you to even apply for the position. All of the advice on here is not GOOD advice!
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  14. California Kid JoJoCal19's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    2,598

    Certifications
    CISSP, CISM, CISA, CRISC, GCIA, GSEC, AWS CCP, CEHv8, CHFIv8, ITIL-F, MSISA, BSBA
    #13
    I definitely wouldn't say the PMP holds no value, but DatabaseHead is spot on in that companies are running (not walking) away from the Waterfall method, and towards Agile (or some form of it). Companies definitely do ask for the PMP, but I've also seen them adding the Agile/Scrum certs in there as well. And it's not just projects that companies are moving towards Agile on, but also their other business processes.
    Have: CISSP, CISM, CISA, CRISC, GCIA, GSEC, AWS CCP, CEHv8, CHFIv8, ITIL-F, BSBA - UF, MSISA - WGU
    Currently Working On: MS Cybersecurity, Learning: Linux/CLI, Git, Python, Pentesting
    Next Up:​ eJPT, eCPPTv2, OSCP
    Studying:​ Code Academy (CLI, Git, Python), eLearnSecurity PTSv3
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  15. Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    1,986

    Certifications
    70-461
    #14
    OP Sorry for partially being responsible for hijacking you thread, this will be my last post on this thread.

    There are a couple of different ways of looking at this. I'll retract my statement and reinstate it by saying: The PMP not as valuable as it once was and in the future will become even less valuable.

    Couple of points to be made why this is happening.

    The PMP was originally designed ~1980. It's an old methodology that for the most part has stolen operational, financial, risk, quality and a few other management disciplines. Anyone who went to a decent school will have some exposure to these. In fact anyone who reads a decent book on these individual management disciplines can gain enough knowledge.

    This discipline is really all about physical projects. Building bridges over massive rivers, new casino, and large physical infrastructure projects. Once the concrete is poured for these buildings its realllllly expensive to redo that work. Same with electrical contractors etc.... These need massive planning cycles, you can't half ass a bridge and expect thousands of people to drive over it everyday, the business is assuming way to much risk. For these types of projects it's great. I would even bucket data center build outs, with generators and all supporting infrastructure falling into the category. So it has value but.......

    Most IT / Business projects don't align or require that type of project management style. In fact most of you aren't project managers, you are project coordinators or leads with some responsibilities. Even if your title says PM.

    The business / IT / BI pretty much all verticals are using agile methodologies to manage their projects. Usually have a charter or scope document with some light planning and heavy execution cycles with a major focus on iterative mindset and encouraging scope change to better suit the business. This methodology has flaws but is far superior to Waterfall.

    That's why you see agile tools being used over the traditional tools. I can't tell you the last I saw a GANTT chart, they don't exist and if they do they are generally high level fluff on a PowerPoint with some artificial time lines. Companies have elected to go with Kanban boards, backlogs with grooming sessions, daily stand ups, sometimes just weekly and a whole host of other techniques. This is reality you can face or not, I don't care to be honest.

    Over the course of 3 years I have interviewed and had casual conversations with recruiters in regards to positions that require a certain element of project coordination. To be blunt, they want agile, period.

    What they don't care about

    MS Project / Gantt charts
    Bloated project documentation (Risk registers, supplier scorecards etc.......)
    Anything waterfall, it actually can hurt you..... I've seen it, it's happened to me.

    What they want

    Are you comfortable working in team rooms?
    Are you comfortable dealing with 15 minute SCRUMS in the morning?
    Can provide reporting to senior leadership out of JIRA, using Epics, stories, sub stories while managing your project deliverables?
    Do you have understanding of backlogs and why they exist?
    Kanban boards
    Moving scope

    I honestly don't care if you think my advice is crap or not. Bottom line is your post was relevant in 2008, not 2018.....
    Last edited by DatabaseHead; 04-02-2018 at 05:12 PM.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  16. Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Robonia
    Posts
    48

    Certifications
    Sec+, ITILv3F
    #15
    Quote Originally Posted by DatabaseHead View Post
    Anything waterfall, it actually can hurt you..... I've seen it, it's happened to me.
    Agree, the waterfall methodology is outdated and should never be used
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  17. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Fort Worth
    Posts
    299

    Certifications
    MS IS, CISM, CRISC, PMP, PMI-ACP, CSM, EMCISA, COBIT 5, ITIL
    #16
    Quote Originally Posted by DatabaseHead View Post
    OP Sorry for partially being responsible for hijacking you thread, this will be my last post on this thread.

    There are a couple of different ways of looking at this. I'll retract my statement and reinstate it by saying: The PMP not as valuable as it once was and in the future will become even less valuable.

    Couple of points to be made why this is happening.

    The PMP was originally designed ~1980. It's an old methodology that for the most part has stolen operational, financial, risk, quality and a few other management disciplines. Anyone who went to a decent school will have some exposure to these. In fact anyone who reads a decent book on these individual management disciplines can gain enough knowledge.

    This discipline is really all about physical projects. Building bridges over massive rivers, new casino, and large physical infrastructure projects. Once the concrete is poured for these buildings its realllllly expensive to redo that work. Same with electrical contractors etc.... These need massive planning cycles, you can't half ass a bridge and expect thousands of people to drive over it everyday, the business is assuming way to much risk. For these types of projects it's great. I would even bucket data center build outs, with generators and all supporting infrastructure falling into the category. So it has value but.......

    Most IT / Business projects don't align or require that type of project management style. In fact most of you aren't project managers, you are project coordinators or leads with some responsibilities. Even if your title says PM.

    The business / IT / BI pretty much all verticals are using agile methodologies to manage their projects. Usually have a charter or scope document with some light planning and heavy execution cycles with a major focus on iterative mindset and encouraging scope change to better suit the business. This methodology has flaws but is far superior to Waterfall.

    That's why you see agile tools being used over the traditional tools. I can't tell you the last I saw a GANTT chart, they don't exist and if they do they are generally high level fluff on a PowerPoint with some artificial time lines. Companies have elected to go with Kanban boards, backlogs with grooming sessions, daily stand ups, sometimes just weekly and a whole host of other techniques. This is reality you can face or not, I don't care to be honest.

    Over the course of 3 years I have interviewed and had casual conversations with recruiters in regards to positions that require a certain element of project coordination. To be blunt, they want agile, period.

    What they don't care about

    MS Project / Gantt charts
    Bloated project documentation (Risk registers, supplier scorecards etc.......)
    Anything waterfall, it actually can hurt you..... I've seen it, it's happened to me.

    What they want

    Are you comfortable working in team rooms?
    Are you comfortable dealing with 15 minute SCRUMS in the morning?
    Can provide reporting to senior leadership out of JIRA, using Epics, stories, sub stories while managing your project deliverables?
    Do you have understanding of backlogs and why they exist?
    Kanban boards
    Moving scope

    I honestly don't care if you think my advice is crap or not. Bottom line is your post was relevant in 2008, not 2018.....
    I definitely agree about the bloated documentation.

    The PMP is more valuable for me because it is a JOB REQUIREMENT as it is in many large organizations.

    I manage data center programs and projects and I use waterfall, scrum and kanban. They're tools that I use to get the job done depending on the situation.
    "If I were to say, 'God, why me?' about the bad things, then I should have said, 'God, why me?' about the good things that happened in my life."

    Arthur Ashe

    Reply With Quote Quote  

+ Reply to Thread

Social Networking & Bookmarks