+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 6 First 123 456 Last
Results 51 to 75 of 131
  1. Senior Member MrAgent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,283

    Certifications
    Sec+, MCP, MCSA 2003, MCTS, MCITP:VA, VCP5, MCSA 2012, MCSE Private Cloud, MCSE Server Infrastructure, C|EHv7, RHCSA, OSCP, GCIH, OSWP
    #51
    I paid particular attention to the buffer overflow section in the Georgia Wiedman book. It definitely helped me.
    Last edited by MrAgent; 05-04-2015 at 12:10 PM.
    2016 Goals: GCIH, OSWP - DONE!
    My OSCP review http://www.jasonbernier.com/oscp-review/
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  2. SS -->
  3. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    160
    #52
    so 5 systems owned.. booooh the last one was tough took me two days jjjeezzz...

    as well I found some good reading:
    Conquering the Command Line, Unix and Linux Commands for Developers - Mark Bates | Softcover.io
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  4. Senior Member impelse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    1,211

    Certifications
    CISSP, CEHv7, CCNA, Security+ 70-290, 70-291 CCNA:S
    #53
    Good info, thanks
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  5. Sarge da_vato's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Online
    Posts
    442

    Certifications
    CISSP, CISM, CASP, CCENT, A/N/S+, C|EH, C|HFI
    #54
    Does anyone know of any other good external resources? I purchased the hackers playbook before I started the course and thought it was ok but not deep enough for me to tie to tactics... last night I purchased the RTFM (red team field manual) because I have heard good things... though that's why I purchased the last book, so we will see.

    When doing research on specific exploits have any of you found other sources than the two recommended in the course?
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  6. Member
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    79
    #55
    Hi all, I'll be starting my OSCP journey soon. Have worked in IT for about 20 years and have had lots of exposure to many a field in IT from Networks to Systems, Databases, Security, VoIP and everything in between. I enjoy puzzles and will be paying for this course myself, thinking about getting the 90 days course with the goal of completing the labs 100% and completing the exam with a score of 100%. I know this is going to be difficult but I'm committed to doing it. I have no problem in the motto "Try Harder" and am fully aware that I will be humbled and perhaps even mentally broken by the experience.I look forward to starting soon The Frog
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  7. Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Kuwait
    Posts
    44

    Certifications
    CompTIA A+,CNE 4.11,CNE 5, MSCE , CCNA ,TCE,TCT,OSCP
    #56
    Hi what sort of information are you looking for ?
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  8. Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Kuwait
    Posts
    44

    Certifications
    CompTIA A+,CNE 4.11,CNE 5, MSCE , CCNA ,TCE,TCT,OSCP
    #57
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  9. Senior Member MrAgent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,283

    Certifications
    Sec+, MCP, MCSA 2003, MCTS, MCITP:VA, VCP5, MCSA 2012, MCSE Private Cloud, MCSE Server Infrastructure, C|EHv7, RHCSA, OSCP, GCIH, OSWP
    #58
    Quote Originally Posted by JollyFrogs View Post
    Hi all, I'll be starting my OSCP journey soon. Have worked in IT for about 20 years and have had lots of exposure to many a field in IT from Networks to Systems, Databases, Security, VoIP and everything in between. I enjoy puzzles and will be paying for this course myself, thinking about getting the 90 days course with the goal of completing the labs 100% and completing the exam with a score of 100%. I know this is going to be difficult but I'm committed to doing it. I have no problem in the motto "Try Harder" and am fully aware that I will be humbled and perhaps even mentally broken by the experience.I look forward to starting soon The Frog
    I was only able to get into about 35 or so boxes by the end of my lab time. I did however compromise all 5 of the servers on the exam, with full control of 4/5. I think I scored 90/100 on the exam.

    My point is, you don't necessarily need to get all boxes in the lab to do well on the exam. Just knowing the concepts, and where to look if you get stuck, and of course trying harder.
    2016 Goals: GCIH, OSWP - DONE!
    My OSCP review http://www.jasonbernier.com/oscp-review/
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  10. Member
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    79
    #59
    Quote Originally Posted by MrAgent View Post
    My point is, you don't necessarily need to get all boxes in the lab to do well on the exam. Just knowing the concepts, and where to look if you get stuck, and of course trying harder.
    I understand, the goal of getting 100% in the labs and in the exam is one that I set purely to challenge myself.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  11. Senior Member impelse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    1,211

    Certifications
    CISSP, CEHv7, CCNA, Security+ 70-290, 70-291 CCNA:S
    #60
    Me too, I will try to make it 100%
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  12. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    160
    #61
    Quote Originally Posted by da_vato View Post
    Does anyone know of any other good external resources? I purchased the hackers playbook before I started the course and thought it was ok but not deep enough for me to tie to tactics... last night I purchased the RTFM (red team field manual) because I have heard good things... though that's why I purchased the last book, so we will see.

    When doing research on specific exploits have any of you found other sources than the two recommended in the course?
    These are my array of resources i'm currently using (in bold are my favorites):

    Black Hat Python
    Conquering The Command Line
    Coding for Penetration Testers
    Command Line Kung Fu
    Counter Hack Reloaded, Second Edition
    Ethical Hacking and Penetration Testing Guide
    Google Hacking for Penetration Testers
    Kali Linux Network Scanning Cookbook
    Linux Pocket Guide, 2nd Edition
    Mastering Kali Linux for Advanced Penetration Testing
    Metasploit Penetration Testers Guide
    Netcat Starter
    Ninja Hacking - Unconventional Penetration Testing
    Python Penetration Testing Essentials
    Python for Secret Agents
    Python Programming for Hackers and Pentesters
    Penetration Testing with the Bash shell
    Penetration Testing - A Hands-On Introduction to Hacking
    Professional Penetration Testing - Creating and Learning in a Hacking Lab
    The Linux Command line - A Complete Introduction

    Although after reading a lot, i understood that hacking is not really something a book can/will teach you, i mean for me the enumeration is not a problem but i tend to have issues at seeing clearly and rapidly enough "how" will I break in this system or "how" will I escalate privileges correctly and efficiently.

    I think I've understood that books will give me a quick answer to this or that but the attack angle should be my own jiu jitsu, which can only come after failing for the 100 times hence the Try Harder i guess..

    RTFM is really good as well and super handy to have on your desk everyday really...

    On your last question, I've read somewhere that PWK/OSCP rely uniquely on exploit-db exploits. Which i think makes sense. So i guess that a correctly targeted searchsploit on your updated db should bring the goods to surface i'd say.

    Last, i've made a statement not to touch metasploit (i mean as an automated point and shoot weapon) in the labs so i might move slowly but i'm moving manually hehe..

    Cheers,
    m.
    Last edited by mokaz; 05-05-2015 at 08:31 AM.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  13. Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Kuwait
    Posts
    44

    Certifications
    CompTIA A+,CNE 4.11,CNE 5, MSCE , CCNA ,TCE,TCT,OSCP
    #62
    What information are you looking for ? make sure you know your linux commands well .
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  14. Sarge da_vato's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Online
    Posts
    442

    Certifications
    CISSP, CISM, CASP, CCENT, A/N/S+, C|EH, C|HFI
    #63
    @mokaz: thanks for that list, I have read a few of those and never heard of others. I will definitely look into the titles I have not read. I am using your same approach in regards to metasploit, I have not used it once. I don’t see the point if we can’t use it for the exam and I always train as I fight (it’s a soldier thing).

    @melvinfz: I was curious if anyone had found sources that help them when they get stuck on an issue. I don’t have a group of local colleagues (in this specific field, my colleagues are all R&D and general IT types) that I can converse with when I have a problem that I can’t get past.

    The sources that I had found were heavily geared towards metasploit like “The hackers playbook” for instance. If I am staying away from metasploit, I need to think of another way to accomplish the same task manually and the answer is rarely, if ever, obvious. The forum and IRC channel help from time to time but I am often met with “try harder…” which I am not asking for the specific exploit but rather an inkling or a topic that I can go research.

    Reply With Quote Quote  

  15. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    160
    #64
    Quote Originally Posted by da_vato View Post
    @mokaz: thanks for that list, I have read a few of those and never heard of others. I will definitely look into the titles I have not read. I am using your same approach in regards to metasploit, I have not used it once. I don’t see the point if we can’t use it for the exam and I always train as I fight (it’s a soldier thing).
    Easy bro -- shoot me a PM and we'll get in touch via good'ol smtp.. Also, this is what i've read at offsec about labs metasploit and the exam:

    Metasploit usage is encouraged in the labs. Metasploit is a great tool and you should learn all of the features it has to offer. While Metasploit usage is limited in the OSCP certification exam, you don't want to place arbitrary restrictions on yourself during the learning process.

    So im using msfcli msfvenom and try metasploit here and there although i force myself in systems manually...
    Last edited by mokaz; 05-06-2015 at 12:57 AM.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  16. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    617

    Certifications
    Alphabet-soup
    #65
    Keep in mind that msfencode, msfpayload, and other things are allowed during the exam. I agree with the statement that you should use the heck out of it in the lab and see how it all works. One thing I did in the labs was to use msf for an exploit, then rework the exploit manually myself. I learned a ton doing that.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  17. Senior Member impelse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    1,211

    Certifications
    CISSP, CEHv7, CCNA, Security+ 70-290, 70-291 CCNA:S
    #66
    I just got to my 5 machine, two of them I got access using web application misconfig, I prefer that way that modifying the exploit, LOL.

    Now keep trying harder.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  18. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    230

    Certifications
    A+, Security+, CCENT, C|EH, GCFE, GCFA, GREM
    #67
    Quote Originally Posted by BlackBeret View Post
    Keep in mind that msfencode, msfpayload, and other things are allowed during the exam. I agree with the statement that you should use the heck out of it in the lab and see how it all works. One thing I did in the labs was to use msf for an exploit, then rework the exploit manually myself. I learned a ton doing that.
    I've been using this method as well, and it is paying dividends for me. It kind of provides a demo of how things should work before going back to learn how to do it for real. Also, given how standard Metasploit is, I think knowing how to use it is very important.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  19. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    160
    #68
    Quote Originally Posted by impelse View Post
    I just got to my 5 machine
    Great, nice to see you moving on !!!!

    I've just seen my 8th system falling today.. not the one I've been after the whole night, but one I've had a low priv shell on from before and manged to see how to priv escalate...

    So it's not very much pwnage since April 12th although i'm learning everyday pile of things..
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  20. Senior Member impelse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    1,211

    Certifications
    CISSP, CEHv7, CCNA, Security+ 70-290, 70-291 CCNA:S
    #69
    In my case I was moving slowly because I concentrated not to move to the next machine until I hack the one I was working, I lost a lot of time, now I can comeback with more confident that I will able to own them, take me the average 6 to 7 hours per machine )if I take the average with the ones I was not able to hack).
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  21. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    160
    #70
    Quote Originally Posted by impelse View Post
    In my case I was moving slowly because I concentrated not to move to the next machine until I hack the one I was working
    I sure know what you mean; i've had a hard time movin' on to the next host although i really really think it's a good approach, you see things differently once you're back on something you've spend hours...
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  22. Sarge da_vato's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Online
    Posts
    442

    Certifications
    CISSP, CISM, CASP, CCENT, A/N/S+, C|EH, C|HFI
    #71
    Glad to hear you guys have been making great progress. Unfortunately life has been getting in the way and I have not had any time to mess around in the labs.

    I am going to take BlackBeret's advice of using metasploit then manually rework... I think that is some of the best advice I have heard in regards to OSCP.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  23. Senior Member impelse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    1,211

    Certifications
    CISSP, CEHv7, CCNA, Security+ 70-290, 70-291 CCNA:S
    #72
    Quote Originally Posted by da_vato View Post
    I am going to take BlackBeret's advice of using metasploit then manually rework... I think that is some of the best advice I have heard in regards to OSCP.
    I tried to do that two years ago and never worked, you become to used to metasploit that you never go to manually, in this occasion not metasploit only for payloads and I've getting better result, sure in the real life you use all of them
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  24. ohm
    ohm is offline
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    12
    #73
    One additional resource that might be helpful is OWASP Testing Guide https://www.owasp.org/index.php/OWAS...le_of_Contents
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  25. Senior Member impelse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    1,211

    Certifications
    CISSP, CEHv7, CCNA, Security+ 70-290, 70-291 CCNA:S
    #74
    it is amazing how the web attack vector make it more easier to hack the server, I am attacking my third machine using web attack, I almost got root in this one.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  26. Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    77

    Certifications
    CISSP, GSEC, GCED, GWAPT, GISP
    #75
    Quote Originally Posted by mokaz View Post
    These are my array of resources i'm currently using (in bold are my favorites):
    Black Hat Python
    Conquering The Command Line
    Coding for Penetration Testers
    Command Line Kung Fu
    Counter Hack Reloaded, Second Edition
    Ethical Hacking and Penetration Testing Guide
    Google Hacking for Penetration Testers
    Kali Linux Network Scanning Cookbook
    Linux Pocket Guide, 2nd Edition
    Mastering Kali Linux for Advanced Penetration Testing
    Metasploit Penetration Testers Guide
    Netcat Starter
    Ninja Hacking - Unconventional Penetration Testing
    Python Penetration Testing Essentials
    Python for Secret Agents
    Python Programming for Hackers and Pentesters
    Penetration Testing with the Bash shell
    Penetration Testing - A Hands-On Introduction to Hacking
    Professional Penetration Testing - Creating and Learning in a Hacking Lab
    The Linux Command line - A Complete Introduction

    Although after reading a lot, i understood that hacking is not really something a book can/will teach you, i mean for me the enumeration is not a problem but i tend to have issues at seeing clearly and rapidly enough "how" will I break in this system or "how" will I escalate privileges correctly and efficiently.

    I think I've understood that books will give me a quick answer to this or that but the attack angle should be my own jiu jitsu, which can only come after failing for the 100 times hence the Try Harder i guess..

    RTFM is really good as well and super handy to have on your desk everyday really...

    On your last question, I've read somewhere that PWK/OSCP rely uniquely on exploit-db exploits. Which i think makes sense. So i guess that a correctly targeted searchsploit on your updated db should bring the goods to surface i'd say.

    Last, i've made a statement not to touch metasploit (i mean as an automated point and shoot weapon) in the labs so i might move slowly but i'm moving manually hehe..

    Cheers,
    m.
    Some of these are already in my personal library; others on the list I will looking for, based on your recommendations. Books are no substitute for hands-on, but they definitely are useful as a reference and to broaden the horizon and one's view of what's already known to be possible.

    Thanks much!
    ~justjen
    Reply With Quote Quote  

+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 6 First 123 456 Last

Social Networking & Bookmarks