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  1. Member
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    #26
    Good luck HCPS123!! Looks like you have a similar journey to what I had planned, it' definitely achievable.
    Last edited by t17hha; 02-21-2018 at 01:57 PM.
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  3. They are watching you NetworkNewb's Avatar
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    #27
    Quote Originally Posted by HCPS123 View Post
    I ended up scoring a 93 in the class, second highest, and went up to the instructor and asked him to unlock a practice ICND1 test I saw on the site we were using. He reluctantly opened it for me......for ten days, and then proceed to tell me that I wasn't ready for ICND1. Yea, that felt good to hear. *Sigh* In any case the other classes shouldn't be as hard so I should get back on track to doing studying on my free time for ICND1.
    I would never rely on another person telling if I was ready for a test or not. If you understand and are able to describe all the exam topics Cisco has listed for the exam, I'd assume you would be ready for the exam. There will always be in life who don't think you can accomplish things and try to hold you down. Or just because they couldn't do it or because it took them a long time to accomplish it they think the same rules should apply to you... Screw those people.

    Keep up the hard work!
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  4. Senior Member shochan's Avatar
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    #28
    yeah, in my mid 20's, I was SO broke and sort of feeling lost on what to get into...but then finally decided to get into computers after building my first system from scratch (Athlon AMD 650, lol). Once I did this, I was really motivated to get my AAS CIS degree & try to get my foot in the door somewhere...it was definitely tough at first, many failed interviews and failed CCNA twice (v1 & v2)...So, I went after & passed my A+, Net+ and that started getting me some more interviews and finally a job, it wasn't a great paying job, but I knew I had to gain more experience before I could land a more technical position. Just keep in mind, experience is really what you are after because a paper cert will give you some of the knowledge & maybe foot in the door somewhere, but actually doing the setups & configurations in real world experience is what you really want. Cheers & Hi5!
    2018 goals -> PenTest+ Beta (awaiting results), CCNA CyberOps (DQ'd), Linux+ 103 (Aug), Linux+ 104 (Oct), CEH (Dec).
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  5. Senior Member cshkuru's Avatar
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    My puny list of certifications made me feel inadequate so now you have to guess :-)
    #29
    Former Navy here, very familiar with their instructional techniques. It's the firehose method the idea is to expose you to as much material as possible and then have you achieve mastery in the Fleet under the mentorship of your LPO / LCPO. It works mostly but you have to take the imitative to learn on your own too.

    Like most of the others here I think you should skip the C|EH, especially if you are planning on going for the OSCP.

    One thing I have noticed is you seem to be skipping over some great free resources. Cybrary and Udacity have some great free course. As a military member you can sign up for FedVTE and there are a lot of distance learning programs available for realtively cheap (i.e. Stanly Community College) also don't write off the SANS course. They do quite a bit of training for the military. When you get to the Fleet keep your eyes open for the opportunity to attend.
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  6. Member
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    #30
    Good luck HC, your plan sounds like a good approach. My only advice would be to consider doing SLAE before learning Assembly. You'll pick up a lot (do the SLAE certification, it's only 300 dollars or so for both 32bit and 64bit). The cert is where you'll learn a lot and SLAE will teach you assembly and linux, and some GDB etc. I also advise starting some CTFs and joining a local hacker/security club. If you can, try and do a talk every now and then about a particular topic you've learned about (you can typically do these at sectalks or local security club, or even the bigger conferences if you did lots of research on a particular topic and want to rub off some of your experience on others) - this will build some rep and help build confidence in public speaking - it also helps retain knowledge. Best of luck!
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  7. Member
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    #31
    I LIVE!!!!

    t17hha, NetworkNewb, shochan: Thank you so much for the words of encouragement.

    cshkuru: Thank you so much for the advice. I actually haven't heard of those resources so that's very useful to know, thank you. I definitely want to do more research into them later. And I definitely will be reevaluating CEH on my list.

    JollyFrogs: Hmmmm, I've never heard of SLAE before. I'll look into it. As for the other things, I'd definitely like to do that as soon as I can get some free time Sadly just finding the time to study for ICND1 has been a struggle recently.

    Update: So as one can see I greatly over estimated how much free time I would have to study for my cert I've had to push my exam date back twice at this point and I swear if I don't take it by the end of March I'm going to be very disappointed in myself.

    Study wise I've started from scratch on watching the Chris Bryant videos and I'm currently on his Section 11 out of 18 for CCENT. I've also switch to using Wendell Odom's book and was pleasantly surprised. Many people had warned me Odom's book was written like a tech manual (aka very dry, wordy and boring) but I find that not to be the case at all. While Odom does go into a lot of detail about the subjects (which I prefer), it's still an interesting and pleasant read and I find his passion and personality still comes on through. I also just like how his book is setup more. Currently on Chapter 10 out of 36.....or 38, can't remember off the top of my head.

    I'm also in a unique weird situation. So my military class was like a bootcamp style CCNA class where I was forced to cram and dump (despite my best efforts to learn the material as much as I could in the given amount of time) so I've been regoing over a lot of stuff I've already seen in said class from the other material. That's kinda created this feeling in me where part of me feels like I'm ready, that I should just schedule my exam for this Friday and take it. The logical/fearful part of me though thinks this is just false confidence. That I should complete Odom and Bryant's study material first like I originally planed to to cover any missing knowledge and really hammer in what I need to know.

    Going the safe route wouldn't normally be a problem it's just that recently finding the time to study has been very hard so it's become frustrating since I was planning to have already taken the exam by this point and moving on to ICND2. But I don't want to waste my money and rush things when the goal should be to calmly sit down and master the material so that I can use these skills in a work environment. The hardest thing I've had to do so far is restrain myself, to teach myself that mastery doesn't come from a sprint but practice and patience.
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  8. K-9
    K-9 is offline
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    #32
    So glad to hear you are not giving up on this. Review those goals every week and don't be afraid to adjust the order or content.

    I did a similar thing several years ago. I made a five year plan that seemed like a dream list of certs. I was actually amazed that I did hit my goals.

    It works. Don't give up.

    Best of luck!
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  9. Member
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    #33
    Update: I live!!! Again, ok this time I'm more determine to keep to a better schedule! I'm ashamed to say it but it's taken me WAAAAAAY too long to get ready for ICND1, almost five months I want to say (almost scared to find out real date) O.o Good news is that I've finished both Odom's book and Chris's videos!!! I learned a great deal from them and had a lot reinforced to me. With nothing holding me back now (except my fears) I've scheduled my exam for Thursday. Until then I plan on bunkering down, practicing my packet tracer skills, good old port memorizing and other random facts with self made flashcards.

    Definitely feeling nervous because of how long I've been studying for this, that and I've sort of become the running joke of the class with everyone wanting to crack a joke about me carrying around my book so if I fail I'm definitely going to feel really bad. Still despite my fears and insistence from other people in the class, I'm NOT going to use dumps. I LIKE CCNA, I like configuring routers and learning about networking and beyond the fear of failure there's a need in me to know how good I really am at this now. It's a weird feeling to describe, but in the words of anime, "even if a good part of me is scared I'm about to fall, and even bigger part wants to see how high I can get before that moment".

    Oh and in other sad news, because I waited so long to check in the forum I missed my chance to get an elearning bundle *cries in corner*. See kids, this is why you should stick to your update posts.
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  10. Member
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    #34
    Update: PASSED ICND1!!!!! VICTORY! VICTORY! That's my battle cry!!!!!

    I am now CCENT certified!!! I'm going to go ahead an update my posts and post a review on ICND1 in a bit, but needless to say I'm super happy and ICND2 you're next!!!
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  11. Junior Member
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    OSCP, CISSP, Prince2 (F), CCNP R/S, ITILv3 (F), CCNA R/S, CCNA Sec, Fortinet NSE 4, BTech E&C
    #35
    Quote Originally Posted by HCPS123 View Post
    Update: PASSED ICND1!!!!! VICTORY! VICTORY! That's my battle cry!!!!!

    I am now CCENT certified!!! I'm going to go ahead an update my posts and post a review on ICND1 in a bit, but needless to say I'm super happy and ICND2 you're next!!!
    Congrats !!, I enjoyed reading your posts. Your plan looks solid, it took me around the same time to get all the certs i.e. 5-6 years. Just take it one at a time, and keep the momentum, eventually it will snowball into something much bigger than you have ever imagined.
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  12. Member
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    #36
    Techand$$ = Thank you so much for the kind words and I will!!

    Update: So apparently there's a limit to how far back you can edit a post O.o So I won't be able to edit my first post like I thought, instead I'm just going to post the updated goal list as they update so here we go. Oh and here's a link to my review if anyone is interested in it. http://www.techexams.net/forums/ccna...ml#post1142567




    Sec+ = Completed

    CCNENT = Completed

    CCNA = Currently Studying for

    CEH

    CCNA: Sec

    CISSP

    (Place Holder)

    Powershell

    Bash

    Python

    Assembly Language

    (Place holder)

    eJPT

    eCPPT

    OSCP
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  13. Junior Member Registered Member
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    MCP. MCSA+S. MCSE+S. MCTS. MCSITP: Enterprise Admin. MCSA Server 2008, 2012. Windows 8. MCSE: Private Cloud. MCT. ITIL. ISFS. CEH.
    #37
    I'm an OSCP since 2016, and let me advise you (with all respect):

    Sec+ = Completed

    CCNENT = Completed

    CCNA = Currently Studying for

    CEH > Don't take, I see a lot of jobs opportunities telling you something like this: "OSCP & OSCE won’t hurt your chances, CEH might."

    **** From this point, I don't see why to take all these exams:
    CCNA:

    CISSP

    eJPT

    eCPPT

    ***** Till here.... If you ask me why I don't recommend CISSP, the answer is: If you want to me a Security Manager or CISO, or something like that, you should take CISSP, but you're looking for Pentesting, so focus in pentesting courses and learning *******

    Powershell > Pospose this to the future

    Bash > Sure, and it's not that hard

    Python > Sure, I recommend you SPSE from pentesteracademy, Vivek course, great course!!, but I passed the exam using the Kali scripts, and tools, and a lot of bash, when you take the PWK course, you'll learn some basis of python. But if you know programming, you'll not have troubles.

    Assembly Language > Pospose this when you get the OSCP, and if you wan't to get OSCE (I'm on this right now)

    Notes:
    Look for OSCP reviews, and don't forget to visit, and read fuzzysecurity and g0tm1lk's blogs, specially for Windows and Linux privs. escalation.
    Practice with some vulns VM like, metasploitable, de-ice, kioptrix, and vulnhub's website.

    Best regards
    Last edited by JDMurray; 05-20-2018 at 07:26 PM.
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  14. Junior Member
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    #38
    Quote Originally Posted by julioiglesiasp View Post
    I'm an OSCP since 2016, and let me advise you (with all respect):

    CEH > Don't take, I see a lot of jobs opportunities telling you something like this: "OSCP & OSCE won’t hurt your chances, CEH might."

    **** From this point, I don't see why to take all these exams:
    CCNA:

    CISSP

    eJPT

    eCPPT

    ***** Till here.... If you ask me why I don't recommend CISSP, the answer is: If you want to me a Security Manager or CISO, or something like that, you should take CISSP, but you're looking for Pentesting, so focus in pentesting courses and learning *******

    Notes:
    Look for OSCP reviews, and don't forget to visit, and read fuzzysecurity and g0tm1lk's blogs, specially for Windows and Linux privs. escalation.
    Practice with some vulns VM like, metasploitable, de-ice, kioptrix, and vulnhub's website.
    I'll disagree with the CISSP thing. HC is starting their career and it may be beneficial to their career while in the military to pass the CISSP. I wouldn't underestimate what passing the cert (and a few others as listed in the original post) could help to promotion or increased responsibilities.

    The CEH on the other hand I hear is a much more interesting situation. Some people hate it. Some people love it. Thats probably a personal decision.
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  15. K-9
    K-9 is offline
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    #39
    HCPS123: After every certification, always look back over your list and reassess. It is ultimately your time, money, and choice. I changed my list a bit over time. Always look it over after every cert and decide for yourself.
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  16. Senior Member
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    #40
    Quote Originally Posted by julioiglesiasp View Post
    I'm an OSCP since 2016, and let me advise you (with all respect):

    Sec+ = Completed

    CCNENT = Completed

    CCNA = Currently Studying for

    CEH > Don't take, I see a lot of jobs opportunities telling you something like this: "OSCP & OSCE won’t hurt your chances, CEH might."

    **** From this point, I don't see why to take all these exams:
    CCNA:

    CISSP

    eJPT

    eCPPT

    ***** Till here.... If you ask me why I don't recommend CISSP, the answer is: If you want to me a Security Manager or CISO, or something like that, you should take CISSP, but you're looking for Pentesting, so focus in pentesting courses and learning *******

    Powershell > Pospose this to the future

    Bash > Sure, and it's not that hard

    Python > Sure, I recommend you SPSE from pentesteracademy, Vivek course, great course!!, but I passed the exam using the Kali scripts, and tools, and a lot of bash, when you take the PWK course, you'll learn some basis of python. But if you know programming, you'll not have troubles.

    Assembly Language > Pospose this when you get the OSCP, and if you wan't to get OSCE (I'm on this right now)

    Notes:
    Look for OSCP reviews, and don't forget to visit, and read fuzzysecurity and g0tm1lk's blogs, specially for Windows and Linux privs. escalation.
    Practice with some vulns VM like, metasploitable, de-ice, kioptrix, and vulnhub's website.

    Best regards
    If you are going to go red team, CCNA:Security probably isn't necessary. There is some good knowledge but honestly you will learn enough from a CCNA...a company isn't really going to have you looking at the tools covered in CCNA:Security, but they might have you look at firewall rules.

    CEH is not going to "hurt you" in any way except paying the cost of the exam / materials. CEH still serves as a good starter certification for red team because it gives you broad exposure...with that being said, be prepared to continue onto higher level certifications (GPEN, OSCP, etc.) to get the big impact.

    The CISSP is a great certification to have, but especially as a junior level pen tester you probably won't need it. As you become more senior you should have the knowledge to help organizations at a deeper level, but at the junior level you are going to be trying to find technical flaws.

    Prior to CEH, learn bash and powershell at the same time. These can get complex but honestly you will get to an intermediate level pretty quick. Then after going through OSCP (or maybe before) start to learn Python. After OSCP, learn C and C++ so you can start to learn the exploit development side of things...you can also learn Assembly, especially if you are going to go for OSCE.
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