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  1. Senior Member
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    #26
    Congratulations on the pass. I'm also a military contractor. Now, that you've passed the Security+, you meet the requirements of DoD 8570. This should open up more employment opportunities.

    I was in a similiar dilemma as you. I thought after getting the Security+, should I do the Network+ or go after the CCENT/CCNA.

    I'm a little bit older than you (I'm almost 40). Based on the advice of the networking staff, they all (except one) told me to go for the CCENT/CCNA. Their feelings were that the Network+ was generic/vendor neutral and not very technical.

    The one person that said I should go for the Network+ said it would be a good catalyst into learning networking, and it would prepare me for the CCENT/CCNA.

    Both viewpoints are right. The cost of CCENT is $150. The cost of Network+ is roughly $277.

    You could take the ICND1/ICND2 and pay $300, versus the $277 for the Network+. In my humble opinion, the ICND1 is more respected than the Network+ and cheaper.

    One advantage of taking the Network+ is that when you update the CEUs for the Security+ (which is 50 units in three years), you'll also keep your N+ current.

    My situation and perspective is different. And what I wrote down are only my opinions.

    The advantage you DO have is your age. You have plenty of time to comfortably expand your skills and your knowledge base.

    Do what feels right to you.
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  3. Junior Member
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    #27
    hannism,

    Thanks for the feedback. Regarding both certs, I totally agree.

    I decided a few weeks back to knock Network+ out. I'm with you about the CCENT/CCNA route. As you mentioned, it's more cost effective and in my opinion (or both of our opinions), more marketable than Network+.

    However, the reason I went with Network+ is because of how much more work I'd have to do. I see Network+ as a great way to prep me for the Cisco exams. I mean, I'm not super new to networking, but I'm also no Lazaro Diaz (funny, yet knowledgeable instructor on youtube).

    I do still plan on taking the ICND1/ICND2 after Network+, but I definitely feel I'm going to need more time to feel confident with CCENT/CCNA. So, I figure I'd knock Network+ and see how I feel afterwards.

    I've already purchased my Network+ voucher and even paid the extra for the bundle, which includes CertMaster & the retake voucher (total was $364). The CE definitely helps justify the initial cost as I plan on getting more comptia certs down the line.

    I went with the bundle for extra assurance though. I'll be taking my exam November 2nd, which was only about 2 weeks worth of study. Conceptually, I think I'm sound. This weekend will be telling if I feel good about going in or not (I can always push it to the right).

    I know this isn't ideal, but I'm just trying to do this before the holidays start rolling in. Of course, there's nothing like having a set date to get you motivated and focused.

    Good luck on your CCNA and please let us know when you've passed!


    Wish me luck!
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  4. Senior Member
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    #28
    momolicious,

    Good luck on the Network+. Please let me know how it goes. For me, I will be taking the ICDN2 on November 16. I'll be going for the CCNA Security on November 30, and the CCNA Wireless on December 12.

    I'll let you know how I do.

    The only other piece of advice I have for you is to really master subnetting and binary math. Know it backwards and forwards. Basically, you should be able to subnet a problem in less than a minute.

    A couple of good resources would be Chris Bryant's book on subnetting, called "CCNA Success: Mastering Binary Math and Subnetting."

    The Kindle version is .99, and it's very good in its explanations. It's not the fastest way though.

    I got the CBT Nuggets from Keith Barker on IPV4 Subnetting. This was invaluable after I learned the Bryant method, or what I call the long method.

    I'm not sure how many subnetting questions you will see on the Network+, but 30 percent of the ICND1 was subnetting.

    It took me quite a while to get subnetting. Once I got it, it was like magic. I could explain the topic to people, teach them how to do it, and seemed like a wizard. So, if subnetting isn't coming easy, don't worry about it. If it were easier, everyone would be doing it.

    Again, best of luck, brother.
    Last edited by hannism; 10-31-2015 at 06:48 PM.
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  5. Woohoo! It's over 1000!
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    #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Mkroadrush View Post
    I find it hard to believe you study for 3 weeks, only 3 weeks and went in and passed without cheating the exam (online sources that provide the exam questions). So I'm putting an (*) asterisk on this.

    Maybe one day you will tell us for how long you REALLY study.
    I'll add my 2 cents here as well. If you are working regularly with the things tested, you often need very little study. I've passed exams, legitimately, with much less than 3 weeks study, sometimes only a day or two prep. Other areas, where I don't have much experience, I've studied for weeks, a couple of months... and then failed. It depends on how much new knowledge you are trying to cram in.

    Security+ is entry level. If you have any significant training or broader experience in Info Sec, you can likely do no more than 3 days of revision and comfortably pass.

    For example, if you are responsible for implementing crypto, then remembering that AES is better than DES, or that 3DES has a 168bit key, or that they are both symmetric, is much easier than if you've never heard of AES before starting to study for Sec+. Similarly, TLS is much easier if you deal with PKI or web site hosting regularly. ACLs are easy if you are a system admin, or configure firewalls. Policy is easy if you are in a medium to large enterprise with lots of policy documents flying around.
    2017 Goals - MCSA 2008, CISSP, CCNP:R+S, Agile PM
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  6. Senior Member ccnpninja's Avatar
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    #30
    Congrats on the pass!
    من طلب عزائم الأمور ، هان عليه بذل النفس فيها - محمد إبن ابي عامر
    www.keyboardbanger.com
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  7. Senior Member
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    #31
    Congrats on the pass. I've been on Sec+ since Sept 1st, and today I'm barely half way through chapter 12 and I don't remember a darned thing. I'm going to struggle heavily with this exam... I was supposed to take my exam (thru WGU) 3 weeks ago.

    So far, I really don't like security.
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  8. Junior Member
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    #32
    joemysterio,

    Thanks and hang in there man.

    I wouldn't spend too long studying. IMO, it hurts rather than helps. You always want to strike a good balance between cramming and no retention. Study the material with a strong desire to want to learn it. Don't take too long as you'll end up forgetting things, and don't study too much as you'll undoubtedly fry your brain. One thing about Security+ is that it's practical. Meaning, aside from learning a lot of specific terminology, you can apply common sense and probably get the right answer. Best of luck to you!
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