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  1. Senior Member coldbug's Avatar
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    #1

    Default Fat

    I came across this question while I was doing Sec+ practice exams. I learned these File Systems on A+ but I don't know why it popped out in the Sec+ since it has nothing to do with IT Security. Anyway, is this the wrong answer they had given because I thought all OS support FAT 32..not FAT.


    Which of the below are file systems that can be used on windows Operating System?



    A. FAT

    B. FAT32

    C. NTFS

    D. ext4

    Answer : A
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    #2
    FAT32 is just a version of FAT
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  4. Senior Member Phalanx's Avatar
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    #3
    FAT is the 16-bit version of FAT32.

    Also, I'm not sure that question might be quite accurate. They don't mention which version of Windows. Windows 10 natively supports NTFS, FAT (16,32,ex) and ReFS, for example.

    As for installing it, you would need NTFS.

    Why is it a security related question? NTFS permissions.
    Last edited by Phalanx; 10-11-2017 at 03:06 PM.
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    #4
    Honestly, I think the question was probably which filesystem CANNOT be used on the Windows Operating System.

    The answer would be D: ext4.
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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by jibtech View Post
    Honestly, I think the question was probably which filesystem CANNOT be used on the Windows Operating System.
    I agree...best practice is to use NTFS on Windows and I can’t imagine anything to do with Security recommending anything but NTFS.
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    #6
    To be nitpicking, Windows NTFS cannot be read on Windows 95 or 98. FAT can be read on all versions of Windows
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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Phalanx View Post
    FAT is the 16-bit version of FAT32.

    Also, I'm not sure that question might be quite accurate. They don't mention which version of Windows. Windows 10 natively supports NTFS, FAT (16,32,ex) and ReFS, for example.

    As for installing it, you would need NTFS.

    Why is it a security related question? NTFS permissions.
    Don't forget EFS encryption.
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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by NetworkNewb View Post
    To be nitpicking, Windows NTFS cannot be read on Windows 95 or 98. FAT can be read on all versions of Windows
    That is part of why I think the question was intended to be NOT usable on a Windows OS. No matter the version, ext4 is not usable on a Windows OS.
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  10. Senior Member Phalanx's Avatar
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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by jibtech View Post
    That is part of why I think the question was intended to be NOT usable on a Windows OS. No matter the version, ext4 is not usable on a Windows OS.
    Not natively.
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    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by coldbug View Post
    ... since it has nothing to do with IT Security.
    You may want to rethink this statement and make sure you never make such a comment in an interview or other business setting. NTFS security features (file level permissions, encryption, etc.) are GIANT compared against FAT.
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    #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Phalanx View Post
    Not natively.

    Nope. Not opening that can of worms. If CompTIA certs required knowing everything that COULD be configured.... holy hell.
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    #12
    Quote Originally Posted by jibtech View Post
    Nope. Not opening that can of worms. If CompTIA certs required knowing everything that COULD be configured.... holy hell.
    Actually...you could just start off every response with “technically” or “officially” and you are good.
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  14. Senior Member coldbug's Avatar
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    #13
    Quote Originally Posted by cyberguypr View Post
    You may want to rethink this statement and make sure you never make such a comment in an interview or other business setting. NTFS security features (file level permissions, encryption, etc.) are GIANT compared against FAT.
    I did not notice any of these File Permissions on any of Security+ materials I have been studying. Yes. I did kind of forget about the Encryption within the file system.
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    #14
    I went ahead and looked it up. According to the Sybex Cert Guide, issues around FAT, FAT32 and NTFS are covered under OS Hardening, which is part of Objective 4.3.

    Aside from testing baseline knowledge, the exam also covers the "convert" command, as applied to FAT and FAT32. Effective use of the convert command requires a solid understanding of the three filesystems (FAT, FAT32 and NTFS), why you would convert, how you would convert what the results of the conversion would be.
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  16. Senior Member Phalanx's Avatar
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    #15
    Interestingly, Windows 10/Server 2016 now supports encryption on FAT32! Little tidbit for you all.
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    #16
    exFAT anyone?

    Regardless, NTFS has security features such as: permissions, auditing, file encryption... FAT is a poor choice with regards to security, a basic file system with zero security features.
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  18. Senior Member coldbug's Avatar
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    #17
    Quote Originally Posted by jibtech View Post
    I went ahead and looked it up. According to the Sybex Cert Guide, issues around FAT, FAT32 and NTFS are covered under OS Hardening, which is part of Objective 4.3.

    Aside from testing baseline knowledge, the exam also covers the "convert" command, as applied to FAT and FAT32. Effective use of the convert command requires a solid understanding of the three filesystems (FAT, FAT32 and NTFS), why you would convert, how you would convert what the results of the conversion would be.
    I think this thread pretty much covered what I needed to know for the exam lol. Thanks guys.
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