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  1. Member Samurai004's Avatar
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    #1

    Talking Domain Local, Global and Universal - Ahh Ha Moment

    Well this is pretty minor on the overall scope of things, but I just had that magical ahh ha moment when I was playing around with TestOut and re-reviewing the groups section in my cruiser in a parking lot at 0400 hrs. I hope more reviewing on some of the other areas with yield the same results since I plan to take the 70-290 in about 3 weeks.
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  3. Still a noob earweed's Avatar
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    #2
    It's good when something difficult finally "clicks" isn't it. I'm studying for my 70-642 and having difficulty with subnetting,hoping to get it to "click" today.
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    #3
    It's a big part of the exam so if you have that sussed you're on the right track!

    Earweed - have you seen Subnetting Made Easy
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  5. Still a noob earweed's Avatar
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    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by mrmcmint View Post
    It's a big part of the exam so if you have that sussed you're on the right track!

    Earweed - have you seen Subnetting Made Easy
    Yeah, it hasn't done it for me. My hand is cramped from doing so many subnetting problems yesterday. I'm probably overstudying this one thing since it'll prob only be 1 or 2 questions on the test but I want to KNOW how to set up subnets.
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  6. BOBBY_TABLES RobertKaucher's Avatar
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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by earweed View Post
    Yeah, it hasn't done it for me. My hand is cramped from doing so many subnetting problems yesterday. I'm probably overstudying this one thing since it'll prob only be 1 or 2 questions on the test but I want to KNOW how to set up subnets.
    Memorize the boundries. It's what did it for me. You only have to do it on the class C boundry as the increments will cary over. What I did was create a deck of flash cards going from smaller increments to larger. On the first week I started with 3. Every morning I recited them as I got dressed. I did that in the morning and played the Cisco subnetting games at night and after 3 weeks I could subnet in my head.

    So my first three flash cards looked like this:

    255.255.255.128
    /25
    0, 128

    255.255.255.192
    /26
    0, 64, 128, 192

    255.255.255.224
    /27
    0, 32, 64, 96, 128, 160, 192, 224

    For me, once I got the theory down this was what made it easy.

    http://books.google.com/books?id=-g7...page&q&f=false
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  7. Senior Member Devilsbane's Avatar
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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Samurai004 View Post
    Well this is pretty minor on the overall scope of things, but I just had that magical ahh ha moment when I was playing around with TestOut and re-reviewing the groups section in my cruiser in a parking lot at 0400 hrs. I hope more reviewing on some of the other areas with yield the same results since I plan to take the 70-290 in about 3 weeks.
    I have this picture that makes remembering which groups can go where very easy. I'll send post it up when I get a chance.
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  8. Senior Member Devilsbane's Avatar
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    #7
    Here is the picture I spoke of.

    The * means in their own domain only.

    So basically what this says, is a global can be a member of a global in same domain, or a member of universal, or a member of domain local, or a member of a local group. However you can never make a local group be a member of a global group. Is that as clear as mud?
    Attached Images Attached Images
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  9. Still a noob earweed's Avatar
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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by RobertKaucher View Post
    Memorize the boundries.
    So my first three flash cards looked like this:

    255.255.255.128
    /25
    0, 128

    255.255.255.192
    /26
    0, 64, 128, 192

    255.255.255.224
    /27
    0, 32, 64, 96, 128, 160, 192, 224

    For me, once I got the theory down this was what made it easy.

    Network Warrior - Google Books
    Thanks for the tip, this'll probably help me. I hadn't really tried to memorize any parts except for the numbers
    128,192,224,240,248,252,254,255 and doing grinding pencil work from there. The place where I'm actually still having problems is when they say , for instance you need subnets with 25 users, 50 users, 75 users (I left off alot of info, notebook in other room) and have to do all the associated work.
    Thanks for that link, it kind of simplifies a few things.
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  10. Still a noob earweed's Avatar
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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Devilsbane View Post
    Here is the picture I spoke of.

    The * means in their own domain only.

    So basically what this says, is a global can be a member of a global in same domain, or a member of universal, or a member of domain local, or a member of a local group. However you can never make a local group be a member of a global group. Is that as clear as mud?
    Good explanation but "clear as mud"..lol
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  11. Senior Member Super99's Avatar
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    #10
    I know that feeling.
    Heres how it clicked for me.
    http://www.laboratoire-microsoft.org...ges/agudlp.jpg
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  12. Still a noob earweed's Avatar
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    #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Super99 View Post
    I know that feeling.
    Heres how it clicked for me.
    http://www.laboratoire-microsoft.org...ges/agudlp.jpg
    I just remembered it as AGUDLP
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  13. Senior Member Super99's Avatar
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    #12
    I remember it as that as well but the picture shows me how it all fits in.
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  14. Member Samurai004's Avatar
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    #13
    I kind of started studying CCENT / CCNA material before I got started with CompTIA and now 70-290. I used TrainSignal for the subnetting and I remember having that ahh ha moment too. I got sidetracked and have not completed the CCNA route yet, so I will probably have to try learning the subnetting again, but it always is a great feeling.

    Those diagrams are great visual references, thanks to both posters for them!

    I should be getting my Microsoft Self Study Kit today via Fedex, just in time for my weekend...I can't wait to try some of the labs in that book. I think I am actually sick, one should not be this excited for a technical book to arrive.
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  15. Still a noob earweed's Avatar
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    #14
    Yeah you should if you're a techie/nerd like me. I get anxious when I order some type of CBT or practice exam even.
    I spent most of day yesterday and day before doing subnetting, still hasn't really "clicked" so I'll come back when I'm reviewing.
    Last edited by earweed; 05-15-2010 at 03:04 PM.
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  16. Senior Member Devilsbane's Avatar
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    #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Samurai004 View Post

    Those diagrams are great visual references, thanks to both posters for them!

    I should be getting my Microsoft Self Study Kit today via Fedex, just in time for my weekend...I can't wait to try some of the labs in that book. I think I am actually sick, one should not be this excited for a technical book to arrive.
    No problem, good luck in your studies.
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  17. Member Samurai004's Avatar
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    #16
    Got my book (with Server 2003 eval copy), my VMware Player and a weekend!

    The book looks great! I have never used VMware before, I installed it on my laptop with Win7 and now I know why everyone raves about VMware.

    A quick question though...

    Can I add, say, two more virtual windows client machines to create a one virtual server and two virtual client lab on my single laptop. Or will there be issues with ip addresses and other connectivity problems that would "confuse" Active Directory? I guess basically to set up a lab should I just stick to the Server 2003 and the basic exercises in the book, or, the above multi virtual lab setup?
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  18. Virtually Certifiable tbgree00's Avatar
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    #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Samurai004 View Post
    Can I add, say, two more virtual windows client machines to create a one virtual server and two virtual client lab on my single laptop. Or will there be issues with ip addresses and other connectivity problems that would "confuse" Active Directory? I guess basically to set up a lab should I just stick to the Server 2003 and the basic exercises in the book, or, the above multi virtual lab setup?
    I have been running a lab out of vmware fusion and tried out a couple of different situations. I ended up setting the virtual nics to host only to keep it from messing with my home network. I set a static IP address within the host's subnet for the domain controller and let it assign dynamic to the xp vm. My only issue is that I can't RDC to it from another PC in my house anymore which wouldn't be an issue for you.
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  19. Still a noob earweed's Avatar
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    #18
    As long as you have sufficientRAM to support the extra clients you shouldn't have a problem. One of the best things about VMWare is being able to configure your VM's connectivity giving you the choice of your VMs being in their own isolated netwrk or connected to your network (internet access, access to the same network your PC is on)
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  20. Senior Member Devilsbane's Avatar
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    #19
    You can have as many VM's running as your system can hold. The biggest limitation is RAM. If you are trying to use your host machine along with 2 or 3 vista machines on 4GB of ram, your system will just crawl.

    Really the only other limitation is Hard disk space. Having many Virtual hard disks saved will really eat away at that HDD. But that limits how many can be saved, not how many can be running.

    I also use a virtual lab. Usually 1 server with 1-2 workstations. However I think I'll be adding another server to my suite so I can practice replicating. It should work.
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    #20
    For practicing for the 70-290 you really won't need a bunch of virtual machines. A virtual server and a virtual client would be enough. Keep in mind you can create whatever you want in Active Directory without actually having a bunch of machines. If you have at least one client you can use to test out different user accounts on that will be enough.
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  22. Member Samurai004's Avatar
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    #21
    I am to chapter 5 (of 13) at the moment in the Microsoft Press Learning Kit. I have found I couldn't do only a couple of labs because I didn't have Server02 setup...that was for RDP and Remote Assistance. After that chapter, I haven't needed the second server. Man, labbing really is the way to learn what you've watched and read. I feel comfortable explaining the concepts now.

    I hate that I am tired; have to work and sleep...I wish I could just stay awake and focused for about 40 hours straight.
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  23. Senior Member Devilsbane's Avatar
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    #22
    Labbing is a great way to learn. Also a great way to test. If you are trying to do it, and can't get it, then you can look back at the book.
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  24. Still a noob earweed's Avatar
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    #23
    Labbing helps the learning process a lot It actually helps it even more when things dont work as planned because then you get to fix it. I only have 2GB Ram and only run 3 VMs when necessary, at a crawl. 2 is usually enough.
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  25. Member Samurai004's Avatar
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    #24
    For practicing for the 70-290 you really won't need a bunch of virtual machines. A virtual server and a virtual client would be enough. Keep in mind you can create whatever you want in Active Directory without actually having a bunch of machines. If you have at least one client you can use to test out different user accounts on that will be enough.
    Your absolutely correct, I have only needed a second virtual server about 3 times out of about 20 labs so far.
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  26. Senior Member Devilsbane's Avatar
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    #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Samurai004 View Post

    Can I add, say, two more virtual windows client machines to create a one virtual server and two virtual client lab on my single laptop. Or will there be issues with ip addresses and other connectivity problems that would "confuse" Active Directory? I guess basically to set up a lab should I just stick to the Server 2003 and the basic exercises in the book, or, the above multi virtual lab setup?
    Yes, you can set up your own little network. Requires a little networking, but it isn't too bad. You really only need 1 server and 1 workstation, but if you have more ram and want to add 2 servers and 2 workstations, why not.

    I typically run each VM on 1GB of ram (because I have plenty). But you can get by with even 512 or 128mb and not notice any major problems. (With the exception of your workstation being vista.)
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